Vancouver

What a delightful concept! This show has an array of talented artists from dancers to musicians to actors and more. Each tent provides the participant with a unique experience of sharing with a group their life experiences. The artists then perform an improvised performance in their métier based on what the participants shared. I had the opportunity to meet with 4 performers in 3 separate tents: Yukari Komatsu, John Park and Miho Suzuki, and lastly Zachary Ibrahim.

As two other ladies and I were ushered into the first tent I noticed just how peaceful everyone was. It really...

At the very beginning when Jennifer Martin started speaking about her childhood, I couldn’t follow the connection of the scenes. She seemed to be flitting about with different people and topics that were seemingly unconnected, but as all of the pieces of the story began to align, her childish way of speaking started giving off undertones of dread. Long before anything poignant has been said or done, you know it’s coming. As the story unfurls like a black rose, you’re brought to a very dark place full of possibilities of happiness but never shedding the permeating feeling of loneliness....

From the moment you enter the theatre, the play has already begun. Two men, Shane Adamczak playing Frank and St John Cowcher playing Al , are already on the stage clearly establishing their characters before you even sit in your seat. Adamczak being the rigid somewhat nerdy janitor and Cowcher being the slovenly couch-potato, their characters are the perfect juxtaposition for a comedy.

The Ballad of Frank Allan really worked to engage all of your senses. As the duo begin to speak, their voices carry you through the heartwarming story with a rapid staccato nature that keeps you...

Rich insights into the power of love, courage and ritual in the face of great trauma are at the heart of this drama. Its message of compassion resonates both with classical tragedies and with our own contemporary anxieties about terrorism. It is timelessly relevant.

The play is set in the Scottish countryside, beside a stream, seven years after the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103 in which 270 people died. Grieving the loss of their own family members, and suffering from the trauma of witnessing body parts, metal fragments, and bodies still strapped to their seats falling from...

Produced by RAGMOP, Falling Awake is a delightful creation written and performed by Nayana Fielkov & Matthew “Poki” McCorkle. The duo won a spot in the annual lottery held by the Canadian Association of Fringe Festivals leading to a cross-country tour with this newly created surreal play that wanders between sleep and consciousness.

Upon entering the theatre, we hear strains of old-timey instrumental music. The set is sparse -- a table and two chairs, random dishes on the table, a clothesline with white frilly garments and what turns out to be a bed. As the show opens, a woman is...

Pig farmers are proud people. They have to be. Their families shoulder burdens both absurd and poignant. Bennett’s family history, in this second chapter of my experience with the walkabout bard, spinning his tales of family chaos to an intimate room in Granville Island’s Waterfront Theatre, nicely blends the traditional yarn-spinning of the Outback poets with multimedia, audience participation and familiarity. My Dad’s Deaths feels like the annual catch-up at a reunion, a chance to relive the stories of past reunions and expand on our knowledge of quirky families and how they got so quirky in the first place....

What do we want and why do we want it? What happens when what we think we want turns out to be too scary, or too boring, or too confusing? When do you trust your gut, and when do you ask for advice? Who knows anything about anything?

Relationships are hard, and even harder when you have no idea if your instincts are sound, or if you should phone a friend. With every choice, doors slam shut, but windows open. When many of those doors and windows are virtual, and the choices multiply, what’s a love and sanity seeking homo...

Ryan Gunther’s mock seminar on how to keep a job and do as little as possible, while getting good pay was certainly thorough with a pile of silly statistics, funny strategies, and satiric corporate anecdotes. He makes it clear that business in Fortune 500 companies is like a group of ferrets, which, incidentally, is exactly what a group of ferrets is called, a ‘business of ferrets’ (no kidding) like bosses, oops, ‘crows’ who are called a ‘murder of crows’.

Yes, I did laugh here and there at his advice about how to do effective emails that record your real message...

Today I went down to Granville Island to the newly opened Fringe Box Office!

I parked near Arts Umbrella and popped in to see a friend - she wasn't available, but I noticed a Fringe rehearsal in full swing just off the lobby. Also, one of the staff members offered me a postcard for his upcoming Fringe show - Just Watch Me: a Trudeau Rock Musical (which apparently was well reviewed by PLANK Magazine last year because the postcard featured a quote from one of our 2015 Fringe review team members)....

Vancouver Fringe 2016 - The Sandwich Boards are HERE!

DANCING ON THE EDGE is a contemporary dance festival held in Vancouver. It provides vital cross-pollination between local performers and internationally renowned dance artists. Through platforms such as this, artistic boundaries are expanded for all of us, ever widening the creative field. The festival opened last night with Edge 1; three diverse works which wooed, challenged and captivated its audience.

‘Here on the Ground’, choreographed by Sarah Chase and performed by Meghan Goodman and Julia Carr was a physical theatre piece about the unusual real life friendship of the two dancers. With simple stage props, recorded music, spoken word and...

Joshua Beamish cred J Alex Brinson

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